Design

Mirage architecture in Tasmania

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Mirage architecture in Tasmania

Ben Hosking

A design estuary that does not spoil the surrounding landscape? This is the challenge faced by the Room 11 architects who transformed the Tasmanian River into a colorful bridge-bridge and a modern building.

Last stage of realization for the sinuous installation imagined by the architects of Room 11 for the Glenorchy Arts and Sculpture Park (GASP), which has for vocation to emphasize the estuary of the Derwent river, in Tasmania. Often public walks are studied to "fade" into the landscape, as if their monochrome (even their monotony!) Was a guarantee of ultimate respect for the natural environment. Nothing like it here: color and material are the spearheads of this spectacular architecture, shaped like an arc of circle, which electrifies the calm waters of the Derwent.

A pedestrian walk of 3 kilometers, flanked by two observation pavilions, which seems suspended above the water. The hardness of the concrete floor is softened by the cheerfulness of the red Plexiglas walls of the pavilions and the patchwork of colors that adorn the bridge-walk. No huge budget for this project but a strong aesthetic line well defined, which plays contrasts: minimal straight lines of observation buildings meet the fluid curves of the promenade. Or the architecture of solitude and contemplation.

Identity

Customer: Glenorchy City Council. Opening date: 2014. Length: 3 kilometers. Architect: Thomas Bailey. Team of Architects: Megan Baynes, James Wilson, Aaron Roberts, Nathan Crump, Ryan Cawthorn, Josh Fitzgerald. Materials: Wood, stainless steel, concrete, glass and paint. Awards: Tasmanian Awards - Urban Design, Named Award - Dirk Bolt Award for Urban Design 2014. Website: room11.com.au and gasp.org.au

It's the final addition to the winding installation of the Glenorchy Arts and Sculpture Park (GASP), created by the architects at Room 11 for the purpose of showcasing Tasmania's Derwent River estuary. Public walkways aim to blend or "disappear" into the landscape, as if their monochromatic (not to mention monotonous!) Design is the ultimate sign of respect for the natural environment. However, this project is nothing like that, and it is the forefront of this spectacular architecture that extends the waters of the Derwent.

The 3-kilometer pedestrian walkway is flanked by two observatory pavilions and seems to be suspended above the water. The hardness of the concrete floors is softened by a beautiful pavilion walls of red Plexiglas, a patchwork of colors adorning the promenade deck. No need for an enormous budget: a strong aesthetic concept that plays on the contrasts between the minimalist, straight lines of the observatory spaces and the walkway's fluid curves. It's an architecture of both loneliness and contemplation.

Identity

Customer: Glenorchy City Council. Opening date: 2014. Length: 3 kilometers. Architect: Thomas Bailey. Design Team: Megan Baynes, James Wilson, Aaron Roberts, Mathan Crump, Ryan Cawthorn, Josh Fitzgerald. Materials: Timber, stainless steel, concrete, glass and paint. Awards: Tasmanian Architecture Awards - Urban Design, Named Awards - Dirk Bolt Award for Urban Design 2014. Website: room11.com.au and gasp.org.au

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