Dream Houses

When the stone becomes creative

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All in stone, Anne Vilsbøll's house-studio captures the light with happiness. A place of creativity furnished with sobriety ...

On the heights of the hinterland of Nice, the Danish painter Anne Vilsbøll captures a light like no other. From the blank page that dries in the sun to the explosion of colors, her house-studio, encircled in stone, expresses the brilliance of the South tempered by the sobriety of this girl from the North.

Saint-Jeannet ... rolling hills that stretch at the foot of the imposing Baou. In his poem It's the feast in Saint-Jeannet, Jacques Prévert celebrated the wine there, that of the late harvests which carried the grapes until the tables of Christmas. It is one of those cellars, formerly intended for their winter conservation, which Anne Vilsbøll has invested to create her workshop there. Observing the components of color whose entire sensory dimension she paints, a painter above all else, a cosmopolitan spirit through her ability to simultaneously immerse herself in different cultures, Anne Vilsbøll draws on the sources of several styles. Just as she likes to dissolve the subjects she paints in her paper, her house blends into the mineral landscape of the Baou de Saint-Jeannet. Old stone, with all that it contains of history and future perennial, has been released to better grasp in counterpoint the values ​​of gray or pale green that cover the walls or floor of the workshop.

Stone walls, designer furniture with extreme sobriety

Forming a U-shaped architecture? without any door except that of a tiny bathroom ?, the living spaces are covered in one piece and inevitably cross the workshop. Large sliding windows disappear to reveal at any time powerful and fragmented color variations. As for furniture, it is reduced to the serene use that we have beautiful things when they are as obvious as they are useful. It displays a sobriety of lines that honors all Danish design thinking. Poul Kjaerholm's perfection, the radical simplification and meticulous design, of 1950s leather chairs and a round dining table, like the world on which Herzog & de Meuron's articulated suspensions dance, are the driving force. Upstairs, a desk and stripped iron boxes to think of projects and develop travel and, in its extension, a gray bathroom with lemony patterns, open on the valley. A few steps separate it from the office in a constant worry of fluidity and functionality, materialized by an isosceles bathtub occupying the extreme angle of the house.

A large canvas that covers the terrace

To live an instantaneous daily life, on both sides of this space that she envisions as her "sunny village square", Anne Vilsbøll has installed large variegated gray and white sunshade sunshades. For any room, a raised carved solid Indian bed faces a kitchen protected by the stone vaults of the old wine cellar. Heather iron furniture in Provence and great buffets seem to have been there all the time. It will be like the former dining room where to share the Muscat of Alexandria Baous of Saint-Jeannet, more than ever harvested late to express all its mellowness. Outside, an immense terrace unfolds, open-air workshop where large stone walls with the neat equipment form a protective circle. Out of sight, through a small back door, you can go down a few steps on the fly to the pool that nestles where the space stretches towards the landscape in a dizzying dive. While in the distance, from Esterel to Italy, the sea is there to accompany the rhythm of the household of big blue splinters. Geographically, artistically and culturally, Anne Vilsbøll thus lives her art free from constraint.

Attentive and curious about a thousand things, her imagination constantly enriches her search for new possibilities of representation. Her long untied silhouette, her repetitive and meticulous gestures when she makes her paper reflect ancestral know-how. His handmade paper world tour shows his visits to workshops in India, Denmark or Japan, and his stops on the Côte d'Azur. Fragments of olive leaves sign the weave of the papers she creates, poetic traces of the journeys that her paintings of dazzling colors perform. Colors that she crumples and uses as a language. In this way, Anne Vilsbøll paints tirelessly through themes, representing both the forms of design and the leitmotiv of her Indian travels in Udaipur, Rajasthan, where she created an artists' residence. Gleaned in this Indian Venice from the edge of Lake Pichola, her current series include Buddha eyes whose sum represents what she calls her "Indian puzzle". So many people are open to his world, nomadic, full and mobile ...

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